SCALE OF EFFECTIVE SCHOOL DISCIPLINE AND SAFETY 1

Institution Affiliation

A Positive Behavioral Support System should be encouraged in theschools. Such frameworks allow a better understanding between theteachers and the students. An improvement in the two core componentsof the education system is seen as one way through which theeducation system can achieve its primary objective. The teachersshould be trained so as to acquire skills that extend beyond theclassroom situation. In this regard, it is important to establishthat the learning curriculum is tailored to ensure the wholesomegrowth of individuals. “Wholesome” in this case, refers to thelearning process whereby the students are given the opportunity todevelop other life skills other than those that are applicable in theacademic framework.

The (SESDS) is apositive behavioral support system (PBSS) that addresses behavioralissues of the teachers and the students within a given schoolenvironment. Some of the concepts included in the positive behavioralsupport systems include a critical analysis of the attitudes of thetutors as well as their readiness to implement the necessarybehavioral frameworks in the school. In addition to this, the systemaims at establishing the teacher approaches to discipline andbehavioral management in relation to a given school. In this paper,the analysis is based on a mock school known as Lacy ElementarySchool. The process will involve the analysis of responses from mockquestionnaires involving five teachers namely Veronica Velez,Margaret Ewing, Harriet Ballard, Madeline Taylor, and Francis Giorno.The sets of data attached to each of the staff members will beutilized in examining the effectiveness of discipline and safetysystems.

Some of the components that will be addressed include classroommanagement skills, behavioral interactions and respect, and the levelof accountability by both the school administration and staff.Additionally, the contribution of the teachers with regard to afavorable learning environment within the school will be integratedinto the paper. Lastly, the analysis of data will extend to thesafety and security of the students, staff and the school grounds.

Scale 1

According to thedata available, this section deals with the teachers’ classroommanagement skills. It relates to the nature of interactions betweenthe students and whether the they are encouraged to reinforcethemselves whenever deemed fit. Other factors taken intoconsideration, in this case, include the level of respect shown bythe students towards their teacher and the preparation given to thelearners with regard to both the school and classroom routines. Scale1 also relates to the efforts made by teachers to ensure that theirstudents have grasped the topic of discussion effectively. Itincludes responsibility of teachers towards the students and how thetutors assist the learners in making decisions within the classroom.

According to amajority of the responses issued by the teachers, the classroommanagement skills of the teachers are “Very Good”. Four out ofthe five teachers gained scores that fall under the second highestlevel of effectiveness. However, according to one of the teachers,Harriet Ballard, the classroom management skills are “Excellent”As such she scored 1.95. For the other four teachers, the readingswere as follows: Veronica Velez (2.12), Margaret Ewing (2.8),Madeline Taylor (2), and Francis Giorno (2). The analysis is shown inthe table below:

Velez

Ballard

Ewing

Taylor

Giorno

Score

2.12

1.95

2.8

2

2

Rating

“Very Good”

“Excellent”

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

Table 1: Teachers Effective Classroom Management Skills

Scale 2

This section ofdata dealt with the level of positive behavioral interactions of theteachers. It also included the concept of discipline in the analysis.In scale 2, the teachers were required to post ratings on variousissues. They included information on how the students treat eachother and the nature of interactions within the student population.Moreover, this section of the data identified the level of respectshown by the students when interacting with teachers. To determinethis, the teachers were required to examine the verbal statementsmade by the students and the existence of abusive content in thelanguage. Time management was also discussed in this context with theteachers required to ascertain whether there is sufficient level ofacademic engagements based on the timing of tasks.

According to theresponses issued by the teachers, the nature of behavioralinteractions and respect at Lacy Elementary School was “Very Good”for three teachers. The other two felt that the nature ofinteractions was “Good”. Harriet Ballard (2.6), Madeline Taylor(2.5), and Francis Giorno (2.5) all declared that there were “VeryGood” behavioral interactions and respect between the students andteachers within the institution. On the other hand, Veronica Velez(3) and Margaret Ewing (3.5) declared that such interactions were“Good” as shown in the table below:

Velez

Ballard

Ewing

Taylor

Giorno

Score

3

2.6

3.5

2.5

2.5

Rating

“Good”

“Very Good”

“Good”

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

Table 2: Teachers’ Positive Behavioral Interactions andRespect

Scale 3

This scaleinvolved the levels of accountability of behaviors by theadministration and staff. The questions required responses regardingthe level of accountability shown by the students with respect toadherence to the school rules. It also involved the school spirit byboth the learners and their tutors. The study extended to the numberof disciplinary issues that had to be forwarded to the office, andthe performance of the teachers in enforcing rules consistently andequitably. Finally, the data related to the relationship between thestudents, teachers and administration in sharing the responsibilityof maintaining discipline in the school.

From the datadetailing the responses given by the teachers, it is evident thatmost of them consider the level of accountability and responsibilitybetween the staff and administration to be “Very Good”. This canbe proven by the average scores obtained by four of the fiveteachers. The four included Veronica Velez (2.57), Madeline Taylor(2.1), and Francis Giorno (2). However, two of the teachersconsidered the rate of accountability to be “Good”. The teachersinclude Margaret Ewing (3.7) and Harriet Ballard (3.7).

Velez

Ballard

Ewing

Taylor

Giorno

Score

2.57

3.7

3.7

2.1

2

Rating

“Very Good”

“Good”

“Good”

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

Table 3: Holding Students Accountability for the Behavior:Administration and Staff

Scale 4

The fourth scalerelates to the contributions made by the teachers in ensuring thatthere is a favorable learning environment at Lacy Elementary School.The teachers were required to give their opinion regarding the schoolclimate. As such, they were expected to state whether the teachingbody is involved, cohesive, enthusiastic, relaxed, satisfied, andproductive. Additionally, the questions touched on the level ofinnovation among the teachers in addition to whether they were opento change. Finally, the section discussed the level of optimismshowed by the teachers.

From the resultsobtained, it is evident that most of the teachers believe that theyhave a “Very Good” contribution to positive learning environmentat Lacy Elementary School. Veronica Velez: (2.9), Harriet Ballard(2.9), Madeline Taylor (2.9), and Francis Giorno (2.9) all declaredthat they had “Very Good” contributions to the favorable learningenvironment at the school. On the other hand, Margaret Ewing (3.4)only believed the teachers’ contribution to be “Good”.

Velez

Ballard

Ewing

Taylor

Giorno

Score

2.9

2.9

3.4

2.9

2.9

Rating

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

“Good”

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

Table 4: Teachers’ Contribution to a Positive School Climate

Scale 5

In this case, thestudy focused on the safety of the staff, students and schoolgrounds. Some of the concepts that were taken into considerationincluded the safety of the property of the staff and students.Additionally, the teachers were required to comment on whethervandalism and destruction of school property by the students was anissue that the school administration needed to grapple with. Othersections of the analysis revolved around security within the schoolpremises after the students have been dismissed as the students’opinions on the appropriateness of the school rules.

Madeline Taylor(1.9) believed that the security status of the institution was“Excellent”. Veronica Velez (2.3), Harriet Ballard (2), andFrancis Giorno (2) argued that the safety of the students and staffat Lacy Elementary School was “Very Good”. Finally, MargaretEwing (3.4) felt that the level of security at the institutions is“Good”.

Velez

Ballard

Ewing

Taylor

Giorno

Score

2.3

2

3.4

1.9

2

Rating

“Very Good”

“Very Good”

“Good”

“Excellent”

“Very Good”

Figure 5: School Safety and Security: Staff, Students, andSchool Grounds

The SESDS Results

From theinformation obtained from the teachers at Lacy Elementary School,various conclusions can be made concerning their preparedness toimplement a school-wide Positive Behavior Support Behavior. From theperformances across the five scales, it is evident that there is apositive relationship between the students and the teachers. Theperformance indexes show that the teachers are prepared for the taskahead and can go out of their way to ensure that the learningobjectives are achieved in the long run. In addition to this, thescores indicate that there is positive feedback across the boardranging from the classroom management skills to the security of thestaff, student, and their property.

The teachers areready to adopt a Positive Behavioral Support System due to theirwillingness to participate actively in both the academic and sociallife progress of their students. This is indicated by the exemplaryscores obtained in scale 1 section whereby high scores were attainedby all the teachers. The second factor that indicates the teachers’willingness to adopt the system is the great belief amongst them thatthey make a positive contribution to a favorable learning condition.From the two scales, it can be established that the teachers’ arefocused on the well-being of their students and can, therefore, go togreater lengths to ensure that the primary learning objectives aremet.

Professional Development Targets

Even though mostof the teaching staff posted results falling within the same range,Margaret Ewing had substantially different scores. As such, theprofessional development targets will be tailored to suit her needsmore in comparison to the other teachers. The professionaldevelopment target is to facilitate her admission to the nationalboard of certification. The training provided in this case will go along way in furnishing her with the necessary skills required in theimplementation of the positive behavioral support system (Gonzalez,2015). The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS)ensures that all the certified members are conversant and welltrained to engage the students in any form of activity that would beuseful in their growth. In addition to this, the professionaldevelopment targets should include the choice of the most appropriatePBSS Model as well as needs assessment and resource analysis(Gonzalez, 2015). Based on the findings, it was clear that the levelof accountability is relatively efficient at Lacy Elementary School,and as such the PBSS should be implemented to enforce the frameworksthat have already been put in place to ensure that there are positivebehavioral factors within the learning institution.

SESDS Professional Development

Before theimplementation of PBSS in a school, various factors should be takeninto consideration (Covey, 2013). The level of preparedness of theteachers is one of the most important variables in ensuring that thesystem achieves its primary objectives in the long run. In this case,a professional development session will be held for the teachers. Thecourse is aimed at enabling the tutors to identify the mostappropriate PBSS Model to be implemented at Lacy Elementary School.When making a choice about the most suitable PBSS model, the teachersare required to match the implementation process and the outcome thatis expected at the end of the session (Covey, 2013). This session isgoing to use PowerPoint presentations and diagrams to indicate theprocess of choosing the best model.

In instanceswhereby such a model is implemented within a larger area such asstate-wide schools, the decision is made by the education officers.However, in this case, the process is exclusive to Lacy ElementarySchool and as such the five teachers are required to select the mostefficient one by themselves. It will, therefore, be prudent to obtainall the information relating to the system. The session will beginwith an introductory session during which the speaker will highlightthe importance of the meeting. After that, a schedule containing thedetails of the meeting is to be issued to the teachers. Projectorsand other visual effects will be utilized in the session. MargaretEwing will be given brochures and other related materials tofast-track her registration to the National Board for ProfessionalTeaching Standards (NBPTS).

Conclusions

In the educationssector, it is necessary to establish the scale of effective schooldiscipline and safety as a means of assessing the performance of theteachers and students. This is important since it assists in theidentification of professional development goals for the teacher.Such decisions are usually based on the performance of the teacheracross various scales of measurement. Through the outcomes, it isalso possible to implement other education frameworks such as thepositive behavioral support system. As in the case of Lacy ElementarySchool, the available information has been used to assess theattitudes of the teachers who participated in the SESDS.Additionally, the information has been used in developingprofessional development targets for the teachers.

references

covey,S. (2013).School-Readinessand theSteps forpbss Implementation.School Readiness and the Steps for PBSS Implementation.

Gonzalez, J. (2015). Goal-Setting for Teachers: Paths toSelf-Improvement. Cult of Pedagogy. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cultofpedagogy.com/goal-setting-for-teachers/