Towardsa unified theory of psychology challenges and solutions: AnnotatedBibliography

Towardsa unified theory of psychology challenges and solutions: AnnotatedBibliography

Henriques, G. (2013). Evolving from methodological to conceptualunification.&nbspReview of General Psychology,&nbsp17(2),168.

In this article, Henriques (2013) asserts that the psychologydiscipline needs to evolve from a procedural discipline to a unifiedframework. He claims that the discipline lacks a theoreticalstructure that can effectively address the existing problems. Thishas forced psychologists to cultivate a unified theory that canadvance psychology and solve the existing challenges in an effectiveand structured manner. In this regards, Henriques (2013) proposesthat instead of attempting to unify psychology aspects throughmethodology, psychologists need to cultivate a unified theory as itis the best approach to advance psychology. The unified theory willprovide the needed structure so that psychology can evolve to a moreadvanced metaphysical structure that grounds the discipline in asystematic worldview and assimilate its key intuitions into acoherent dynamism. The proposed unified theory centers on thedevelopment of complexity in the contemporary world thus, itendeavors to combine the different functional cores of differentconceptions. This means that the unified theory will help in definingand interpreting psychology solutions and challenges in a structuredmanner.

The article provides different scenarios and elements of the unifiedtheory. It is imperative to note that the theory encompasses afundamentally realistic approach to scientific discovery therefore,it is an essential concept in structuring psychology elements.Henriques (2013) sees human knowledge as an important element inconstructing psychology perspectives, which means that people canbetter comprehend the importance of the unified theory in creatingsolutions for the existing psychological problems. Henriques (2013)suggests that the unified theory provides an introductory scientifichumanistic perception that deals successfully with the problem ofvalue. The article is comprehensive in its analysis of a structuredapproach towards psychology challenges and solutions. It usesexamples and concepts to illustrate why the unified theory issignificant in psychology thus, the article will be useful inadvancing the elements of the research.

Melchert, T. P. (2013). Beyond theoretical orientations: Theemergence of a unified scientific framework in professionalpsychology.&nbspProfessional Psychology: Research andPractice,&nbsp44(1), 11.

This articlediscusses the successes of psychology as an applied and basicscience. Melchert (2013) also discusses the grave and obstinateconflict between the numerous psychology school of thoughts. Melchert(2013) contends that the traditional theoretical alignments have beeninfluential in theorizing clinical practices in psychology, butunfortunately they have been incomplete and inadequate. Thus, theauthor proposes that a unified scientific framework is the best andmost comprehensive approach to identifying and solving psychologicalproblems. In fact, the article provides that a unified scientificcontext moves psychology beyond the existing problems. Theconventional method has also failed to consider all elements ofpsychology, which has exacerbated the already existing problems andmade it difficult to offer a scientific solution. As such, the authordiscusses the fundamental reasons behind the persistent conflictbetween the different school of thoughts and contends that a unifiedframework is the best-suited approach to resolving these conflicts.Furthermore, the author asserts that a unified framework helps tocomprehend human developments, behavior change, and humanfunctioning.

The articlefirst identifies the existing conflict and the noteworthyaccomplishments experienced in the field of psychology. The articleillustrates that it has become difficult to develop consensusexplanations of psychopathology, personality, and behavior since theexisting framework is incomplete and inadequate. The article gives achronological timeline of the conventional orientations and theirsuccesses, which shows the areas where the orientations havesucceeded or failed. Thus, the article is credible to the research asit shows the failures of the conventional orientations. Furthermore,the article provides that a single unified context is not suitablefor psychology since psychology is still advancing and psychologistsare yet to agree on a unified based methodology. The author proposesa metatheoretical framework, which attempts to identify an essentialelement that needs assimilation. The article is indispensable to theresearch as it shows that psychology is still advancing therefore,psychologists cannot agree on a single unified context. However, theauthor provides that a unified context is the most dynamic andapplicable approach to psychology as it identifies solutions andassimilates different functional cores into a coherent structure.

Morris, M. W., Chiu, C. Y., &amp Liu, Z. (2015). Polyculturalpsychology.&nbspAnnual Review of Psychology,&nbsp66,631-659.

Morris, Chiu, and Liu (2015) evaluate the restrictions of theconventional model for culture exploration and recommend an alternatecontext, polyculturalism. Their article extensively deals withcultures and people’s connections to cultures. In doing so, theauthors posit that different cultures rather than a single cultureinfluence people, which means that the proposed framework helps inillustrating the plural and partial relationships between people andcultures. The connection between psychology solutions and challengesand cultures is drawn, but in a shallow manner, which shows that thearticle tries to illustrate the importance of polyculturalism indescribing psychology elements rather than advancing solutions.

The article will help the reader to understand the elements ofpsychology. Psychology, in its entirety, deals with the mind andbehavior thus, the article relates well to psychology as it studiescultures and people. Morris et al. (2015) first assess thelimitations of the conventional paradigm for cultural exploration andthen recommend a new and advanced framework. This means that theyalso assess the existing structures and psychology and propose a newconcept that connects culture and psychology. Furthermore, theassessment of past literature means that the authors identify theexisting problems and then propose solutions to the problems. Thearticle shows that the proposed polyculturalism enables advancedpsychological concepts of intercultural effect. The article aligns tothe basics of Henriques’ article, Evolving from Methodologicalto Conceptual Unification, as both articles show that an advancedconcept will help in assimilating psychology intuitions into acoherent dynamism

Pezzulo, G., Barsalou, L. W., Cangelosi, A., Fischer, M. H., McRae,K., &amp Spivey, M. (2013). Computational grounded cognition: a newalliance between grounded cognition and computationalmodeling.&nbspFrontiers in psychology,&nbsp3, 612.

The psychologydiscipline has principally focused on empirical explorations with anarrow scope. This means that the discipline has regularly providedfascinating findings, but with no real capacity to create a sharedunderstanding of the human behavior or condition. Psychology hasfailed to provide the desired unity or integration between elementsor psychologists as it has greatly depended on fragmented domains ofinformation rather than consilient contexts. Pezzulo et al. (2013)argue that the conventional grounded theories fail to integrate allthe elements of cognition thus, they propose the assimilation of thetheories with computational modeling. According to Pezzulo et al.(2013), a computationally grounded model of cognition allows thesynchronized deliberation of numerous aspects of the embodiment. Thismeans that the model allows psychologists to determine how embodimentconstrain advancement and expression of cognition.

Although the article does not expressly recommend a unified contextof psychology problems and explanations, it shows that thecomputationally grounded model offers a unifying perception ofcognition. It is essential to note that the analysis of cognition isimperative to the research since cognition has a substantialimplication on psychology and other social sciences. According toPezzulo et al. (2013), the computationally grounded framework targetspsychological aspects by aligning with current theories in cognitionand those that solve behavioral and humanistic problems. However, thearticle fails to provide the potential of the model and where itshows the benefits of the model, it underspecifies the relatedconcepts. This means that although the article has illustrated theconnection between cognition and psychology, it has failed to proposea working framework, but only succeeded in proposing anun-demonstrated model. However, the article provides several benefitsof the model and also support the significance of the model throughanalyzing numerous scenarios.

Uher, J. (2015). Conceiving “personality”: psychologist’schallenges and basic fundamentals of the TransdisciplinaryPhilosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research onIndividuals.&nbspIntegrative Psychological and BehavioralScience,&nbsp49(3), 398-458.

Since scientistsare people, they usually find it difficult to recognize that they arenot independent of their items of study. In most cases, theyexperience challenges especially fallacies and biases, but fail toresolve these challenges as they lack a comprehensible and dynamicmodel that help them overcome these challenges. It is against thisbackdrop that Uher (2015) attempts to illustrate how scientists cantackle these problems by discovering and making clear the theoreticalassumptions being made. The article explores the methodologies andmetatheories that are needed or utilized to empirically research eachaspect. This means that rather than study psychology problems orsolutions, the article studies humans and their personality whenstudying aspects of psychology.

The author first shows why individuals differ and tries to offerdifferent explanations. The author has also provided a plethora ofprocedural and contextual approaches to defining and exploringpersonalities. The article shows why personality is important inpsychology, as well as, shows why scientists should understand theirobjects of study since biases and fallacies are critical psychologychallenges. The author does not suggest a unified theory or conceptto psychological solutions or problems, but he draws a connectionbetween psychology and personality. Furthermore, he shows thatfailure by scientists to recognize that they are not independent oftheir items of research has created a problem for them and only thedevelopment of a metatheoretical context can solve such a problem.Like Melchert’s article, Beyond Theoretical Orientations: TheEmergence of a Unified Scientific Framework in ProfessionalPsychology, the article proposes a metatheoretical context toexploring humans. Thus, although the article does not recommend aunified theory or discusses its merits, it shows that ametatheoretical framework is critical in structuring psychologyaspects.

Walton, G. M., &amp Dweck, C. S. (2009). Solving social problemslike a psychologist. Perspectives on Psychological Science,4(1), 101-102

Walton and Dweck(2009) assert that psychology can play a vital role in providingsolutions to significant social problems. They assert that psychologythrough the provision of a rigorous methodology and the psychologyprocess can greatly solve social problems. In the article, theauthors show the way psychology relates to social problems.Furthermore, they show that different studies on social problems haveillustrated the importance of psychology in construing solutions forsocial problems. The article offers the importance of psychology byshowing how different studies such as the provision of communallyconstructive default decisions have shown the relationship betweenpsychology and the identification or unraveling of problems. Thismeans that psychology is an imperative system in not only addressingsocial problems but also in supporting behavioral frameworks.

Although thearticle provides a comprehensive relationship between psychology andsocial problems, it fails to propose a desired concept or system toaddress the problems. The article only shows the connection betweenpsychology and problems and attempts to show the way psychology helpsin addressing problems, but it fails to show whether the existingsystem is dynamic enough. Furthermore, the article only relates theexisting contexts, which means that it is not comprehensive enough tosuggest a unified concept towards solving psychology problems. It isessential to note that the research tries to identify a unifiedtheory in identifying psychology challenges or solving them, but thearticle extensively deals with social problems and how psychologistscan solve them. Thus, the article may not offer comprehensiveelements or solutions to the research. However, it has extensivelyillustrated that psychologists can greatly solve social problems,which means the cultivation of a unified theory can develop againstthe backdrop of this relationship.

References

Henriques, G. (2013). Evolving from methodological to conceptualunification.&nbspReview of General Psychology,&nbsp17(2),168.

Melchert, T. P. (2013). Beyond theoretical orientations: Theemergence of a unified scientific framework in professionalpsychology.&nbspProfessional Psychology: Research andPractice,&nbsp44(1), 11.

Morris, M. W., Chiu, C. Y., &amp Liu, Z. (2015). Polyculturalpsychology.&nbspAnnual Review of Psychology,&nbsp66,631-659.

Pezzulo, G., Barsalou, L. W., Cangelosi, A., Fischer, M. H., McRae,K., &amp Spivey, M. (2013). Computational grounded cognition: a newalliance between grounded cognition and computationalmodeling.&nbspFrontiers in psychology,&nbsp3, 612.

Uher, J. (2015). Conceiving “personality”: psychologist’schallenges and basic fundamentals of the TransdisciplinaryPhilosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research onIndividuals.&nbspIntegrative Psychological and BehavioralScience,&nbsp49(3), 398-458.

Walton, G. M., &amp Dweck, C. S. (2009). Solving social problemslike a psychologist. Perspectives on Psychological Science,4(1), 101-102.