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Whythe U.S. should give amnesty to undocumented immigrants who havelived in the country for at least five years, instead of deportingthem.

Theissue of undocumented immigrants has been controversial for manyyears. The U.S. policies and economic progress attract people fromall countries, especially those who have a perception that it iseasier to succeed in the U.S. compared to their own countries. TheU.S. had 3.5 million undocumented peoples in the year 1990, but thepopulation grew to 11.9 million within a period of 20 years (Benerra112). This population represents about four percent of the allmigrants. The main question asked by the stakeholders is whether thepeople residing in the country illegally should be deported or beallowed to continue living in the U.S. Illegal migrants who havespent about five years in the country have made an adequatecontribution towards the public programs (such as Medicaid),stimulated the labor market, and paid taxes that justify the need toallow them to continue living in the U.S.

Argumentsfor the issue of amnesty to undocumented immigrants

Somecitizens believe that immigrants take their jobs opportunities, but Ibelieve that these foreigners stimulate the labor market positively.The majority of people who reside in the U.S. illegally leave theirrespective countries to look for jobs in other nations. Undocumentedforeigners stimulate the labor market directly as well as indirectly.They supply the national economy with cheap labor that the localcitizens are not willing to offer. The opponents of the idea ofissuing an amnesty to these foreigners hold that they take jobs thatare meant for the local citizens. However, studies have shown thatmore than 80 % of immigrants are either semi-skilled or unskilled,which implies that they can only take odd jobs (such as housework,construction, and landscaping) that citizens may not accept under anycircumstance (Benerra 123). Apart from the lack of work-relatedskills, newcomers face other challenges (including the poor Englishand improper forms of identification) that leave the manual labor asthe only alternative for them. Most surprisingly, foreigners feelsatisfied with the manual jobs, given that the amount of money thatthey earn in the U.S. is more than what they could earn for the samejobs in their home countries. Therefore, giving them an amnesty andpermission to work without the fear of being deported will not onlysupply cheap labor to Americans, but also give people who reside inthe U.S. illegally an opportunity to earn a living.

Inaddition, I believe that immigrants pressure the government to employmore people (such as teachers and security agents) to attend to theneeds of the unregistered foreigners, which create new jobs for thelocal citizens. Scholars and researchers in the field of immigrationhave also suggested that people residing in the country illegallystimulate the labor market by forcing the government to provide morejobs. For example, an increase in the enrollment of undocumentedchildren in the American schools creates the need for employment ofmore teachers, teaching assistants, maintenance staff, and schooladministrators (Benerra 123). Creation of more jobs at the local andstate levels is followed by an increase in the inflow of federalfunds, which stimulate the economy at the lowest stage ofadministration.

Inmy view, immigrants pay more taxes than the amount that thegovernment spends to address their needs. These immigrants pay taxesdirectly by using fake documents and indirectly by purchasing goods.Most of the people who reside in the U.S. illegally are assisted byrecruitment agencies to look for jobs, where they pay some commissionafter finding the employment opportunities. They may not be able topay taxes directly to the government, but their agencies are taxableentities (Green Garage 1).

Empiricalstudies have dispelled the myth that immigrants do not pay taxes byshowing that they make their contribution in different ways,including employment, direct taxes, and purchases. Most of thestakeholders who hold the view that illegal newcomers never pay taxeslive in states that do not keep proper records that can show theamount spent on their welfare and how much they contribute each year.

Moreover,I am of the opinion that undocumented immigrants subscribe to thepublic programs, but they do not benefit from their financialcontributions. I have come across citizens who say that foreignersresiding in the U.S. illegally use the government programs withoutmaking financial contributions to finance them. However, this is amisguided view since studies have shown that individuals who residein the U.S. illegally pay more taxes than the amount that theyconsumers in terms of public services. A report published by theTexas Comptroller indicated that foreigners who get into the countrythrough the back door make a contribution of $ 117.7 billion in grossdomestic products, which exceeds the amount of $ 424 million thatthey consume in terms of services, such as education, lawenforcement, and health (Benerra 124). Texas Comptroller alsoestimated that the state of Texas will lose about $ 400 million and2.3 % of the jobs that are related to the economic activities ofmigrants by deporting them. Similarly, the state of Arizona wouldlose 140,000 jobs and $ 11.7 billion of gross domestic product.

Frommy encounter with some undocumented immigrants, I have learned thatthey also make direct contribution to the National Social SecurityFund using fake documents, but they do not qualify to claim anybenefits. It is estimated that migrants pay about $ 1,800 perhousehold each year, which is more than the amount that they consume(Immigration Policy Center 1). Additionally, these illegal newcomersare affected disproportionately because they have the means to make afinancial contribution towards the social security and healthprograms, but they do not have the documents to make claims. Forexample, foreigners who get into the country through the back doorcontribute towards the social security services through thewithholding program from their employers, but a claim for Medicaidservices requires a lot of scrutiny. Consequently, people residing inthe country illegally contribute for services that they do notqualify to claim. From this perspective, it is clear that thedocumented citizens benefit from the finances contributed by theillegal immigrants. This implies that it would only be justifiable todocument them in order to enable them enjoy the services they supportfinancially, instead of deporting them.

Counterarguments

Althoughthere is a lot of literature showing that migrants have a lot ofeconomic benefits to the U.S., there are some stakeholders whobelieve that they should be deported. The opponents argue that peoplewho reside in the U.S. without proper identification take jobs thatshould be done by legitimate citizens (Griswold 164). However,researchers have shown that the majority of foreigners who get intothe country through the back door take manual jobs that cannot bedone by the documented citizens. In addition, some citizens believethat local issues (such as an increase in the cost of health) can beattributed to the menace of illegal immigration. This myth has beencountered by the data showing that migrants consume less than theamount they contribute to the public programs. Insecurity is anotherissue that the opponents of the idea of amnesty raise regarding theneed to deport immigrants. However, empirical research has shown thatthere is no strong correlation between criminality and immigration(Tallmeister 8). This is because it is only a small percentage ofpeople who have been associated with criminal behavior compared totheir large population that engage in genuine economic activities.

Conclusion

Illegalimmigrants who have lived in the U.S. for at least five years havemade an adequate financial contribution to support the publicprograms (such as education and Medicaid) and they should not bedeported. By giving proper documentation to affected people who comeinto the U.S. without following the right procedures and allowingthem to continue living in the U.S., the government will be able tosecure hundreds of thousands of jobs and boost the gross domesticproducts. People who come into the U.S. by violating the policies seemanual jobs in the U.S. as a golden opportunity since such employmentopportunities are rare to find in their home countries. Althoughpeople who reside in the U.S. without proper identification have beenaccused of threatening the national security and overstretching thepublic programs, these myths have been disapproved by scientificresearch.

Annotatedbibliography

Benerra,D., Androff, K., Ayon, C., and Castillo, T. “Fear vs. facts:Examining the economic impact of undocumented immigrants in the U.S.Journalof Sociology and Social Welfare14.4 (2012): 111-135. Print.

Thearticle countered the fears that the U.S. citizens have about theincrease in the population of the people who reside in the U.S.without proper identification. The authors argued that individualsresiding in the country illegally stimulate the labor market bytaking menial jobs that cannot be done by local citizens and createdthe need for the government to employ people. The article is based ona review of literature, which allowed the authors to identify trendsrelated to the issue of immigration. The article is a useful sourcethat provides an objective analysis of the issue of individuals whoreside in the U.S. without proper identification.

GreenGarage. Ten critical pro and cons of illegal immigration. GreenGarage.2016. Web. 19 July 2016.

Thearticle addresses the benefits and disadvantages of having foreignerswho reside in the U.S. without proper identification. The authorargues that those who reside in the U.S. without properidentification support economic growth, take manual jobs, and paytaxes, but they increase national insecurity, take some jobs thatcould be done by documented citizens, and overstretch the publicprograms. The article is objective, given that is was published by acredible organization. The fact that the author addressed both sidesof the issue of illegal migrants makes the article a useful source.

Griswold,T., Immigration and the welfare state. CatoJournal32.1 (2012): 159-174.

Griswoldaddress the contribution that the people who reside in the U.S.without proper identification make towards public programs (such aseducation) versus the amount spent to provide these services to them.The authors argue that people residing in the country without properidentification contribute towards social security programs, but theycannot claim services since they do not have proper documents. Thearticle is based on a review of credible sources. It is a usefulsource showing that the migrants do not overstretch public programs.Instead, they boost the current social security and health programs.

ImmigrationPolicy Center. Giving facts a fighting chance. IPC,2010. Print.

Thearticle focuses on the use of facts to analyze myths that are held byAmericans about the negative effects of illegal immigration. Thearticle argues that immigrants contribute more to the public programs(such as Medicaid) than the amount that the government spends toprovide health care and educational services to them. This article isbased on a review of credible articles. It is a useful source thatuses facts to indicate that the negative issues attributed to peopleresiding in the country illegally are baseless.

Tallmeister,J. Is immigration a threat to security? E-InternationalRelations.24 August. 2013. Web. 19 July 2016.

Tallmeisteranalyzes the fear of insecurity among Americans, who believe thatpeople residing in the country illegally are a security threat. Theauthor argues that there is no study that has established a positivecorrelation between immigration and insecurity. The article is basedon a review of empirical studies, which allowed the author toidentify trends on the relationship between insecurity andimmigration. It is a useful source that counters a myth that thestate of insecurity in the U.S. can be attributed to people residingin the country illegally.

Workscited

Benerra,D., Androff, K., Ayon, C., and Castillo, T. “Fear vs. facts:Examining the economic impact of undocumented immigrants in the U.S.Journalof Sociology and Social Welfare14.4 (2012): 111-135. Print.

GreenGarage. Ten critical pro and cons of illegal immigration. GreenGarage.2016. Web. 19 July 2016.

Griswold,T., Immigration and the welfare state. CatoJournal32.1 (2012): 159-174.

ImmigrationPolicy Center. Giving facts a fighting chance. IPC,2010. Print.

Tallmeister,J. Is immigration a threat to security? E-InternationalRelations.24 August. 2013. Web. 19 July 2016.